Rodent-Circle

Rats & Mice

Overview


Rats and mice illicit fear and revulsion in most while some maintain they are excellent pets.

Home owners however have a right to be rodent free.

Business owners have a legal obligation to keep rodents under control in their premises particularly if they are in the food industry.

Why?

Rodents are mammals and as such can act as vectors in spreading diseases to humans.

A lot of the problem with rodents is their ability to have explosions in population based on the resources of the time. I am sure everyone in Australia has seen pictures from rural communities when food resources and weather conditions encourage explosions in rodent populations. Hopefully your rodent problem is not on that scale.

The earliest rodent control dates back to Egyptian times when cats where used to control rodents attaching grain storage supplies.

Treatment Options


Even though you might not like rodents it is important that they are eradicated as humanly as possible.

Depending on your preference we can use anything from chemical rodenticides to other forms of physical trapping.

An onsite inspection could be required to ascertain potential entry points, the size of the infestation and where possible the type of rodent which is causing the problem.

Other considerations like the age of the occupants in the premises, any pets which are present or the type of industry which is being performed in the case of a business premises will also be taken into account.

One of our qualified pest controllers will also give you advice on how to prevent additional infestations.

Types


House Mouse

Mus musculus

Scientific Name

Mus musculus

Identification

Body length 75 mm; tail length 80 mm; weight 15 g. Usually olive-brown; strong musky-mouldy scent. Small notch on inner side of both large upper incisors.

Habitat and Range

Everywhere — from swamps to refrigerators and from wallum country to food warmers. Common. Australia-wide. Immigrant from Central Asia. Also North America, Africa, NZ, Pacific islands, West Indies and Mauritius.

Notes

Nocturnal. Capable of breeding in temperatures from below freezing to 40° C. This is the ‘field mouse’ sometimes said to be encountered in Brisbane. Similar to Common Planigale and Feathertail Glider.

Threats

Reproduces and expands its range regardless of all threats and in spite of predation at all levels.

Traces

Musty smell; screeches while fighting; droppings usually pointed (5 mm long by 2 mm wide) and produced in enormous numbers.


Ship Rat

Mus musculus

Scientific Name

Rattus rattus

Identification

Body length 190 mm; tail length 230 mm; weight 280 g. Sleek-looking; may be any colour from black to white, but generally steel-grey with a white belly; tail much longer than head and body. When pulled forward, ear extends past middle of the eye.

Habitat and Range

Occurs anywhere around human habitation — in ceilings, verandahs, dumps, gardens, shops, warehouses, fowl houses and degraded habitats. Most common rat. In coastal areas around most of Australia. Immigrant from South-east Asia but now occurs throughout the Americas, NZ, France, PNG, Pacific and Indian Ocean islands and the West Indies.

Notes

Nocturnal. Accomplished climber, rarely seen on ground. Surprisingly gentle disposition. Similar to Sewer Rat.

Threats

Thrives on all forms.

Traces

High-pitched calls, sitt-sitt, or more raucous ehh-ehh-ehh. Night-time grinding on woodwork, loud pitter-patter over ceilings. Hollowed-out macadamia nuts, emptied pawpaws, scalped seedlings, empty snail shells assembled in caches. Droppings are blunt pellets (10 mm long by 3 mm wide).